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Over 480 ha of significant habitat important to the critically endangered Regent Honeyeater have been protected with Trust for Nature conservation covenants or 10 year conservation agreements in North East Victoria and a further 15 ha of cleared land re-vegetated.

Over 480 ha of significant habitat important to the critically endangered Regent Honeyeater have been protected with Trust for Nature conservation covenants or 10 year conservation agreements in North East Victoria and a further 15 ha of cleared land revegetated. 

Over the next four years a further 500 ha of habitat for the Honeyeater will be protected, including 200 ha under conservation covenants as part of a new project funded by the Australian Government’s National Landcare Program. 

The Regent Honeyeater was once widespread across south eastern Australia; however its core habitat—fertile plains with large, nectar-bearing trees like Yellow Box, White Box, and Mugga Ironbark—has been heavily cleared. An  estimated 400 adult birds remain across four key breeding areas. Only one of these areas is found in Victoria, centred on Chiltern-Mt Pilot National Park, a stronghold for the Honeyeater’s southern distribution.

Now, a partnership between Trust for Nature and the North East Catchment Management Authority is protecting and expanding this key habitat. The Bush for Birds project will work with local landowners in an effort to protect and enhance Honeyeater habitat on private land. The project also aims to protect two endangered ecological  communities (Box-Gum Grassy Woodland and Grey Box Grassy Woodland) and key habitat for the endangered Swift Parrot.

Landholders within the north east project area may be eligible for grants to support them with the protection and management of habitat. Activities could include fencing of remnant vegetation, weed control, planting native trees and shrubs, ecological thinning and establishing paddock trees.

For information about projects in the north east contact Will Ford (03) 8631 5888 or willf@tfn.org.au

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Regent Honeyeaters. Photo courtesy credit Dean Ingwersen enviroimagery.com

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