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Bandicoots make a comeback

In lowlands nestled to the east of the famous peaks of the Grampians National Park, a local landholder has recently placed a covenant on 146 ha of high-quality habitat.

In lowlands nestled to the east of the famous peaks of the Grampians National Park, a local landholder has recently placed a covenant on 146 ha of high-quality habitat. 

Situated just outside of Halls Gap, the property includes Plains Grassy Woodland, a wetland and 68 ha of high-quality habitat for the nationally endangered Southern Brown Bandicoot, with a very healthy population of the marsupial. It is the first recorded, sizable and naturally occurring population of Southern Brown Bandicoots to have been recorded in this part of the northern Grampians in the last 20 years—up until very recently they were thought to be almost locally extinct. The landholder has put in place a fox control program. 

The property is also home to Western Swamp Crayfish, Southern Pygmy Perch, Tree Goanna, Diamond Firetail, Barking Owl, Powerful Owl and Bush Stone Curlew. The land has long been on a Trust for Nature wish-list for permanent protection. Habitat of this size and quality, with connectivity to the existing Grampians National Park, supports great conservation outcomes and biodiversity in the Glenelg Hopkins region. 

Long before the covenant was secured, the landholder contacted our office to share photos to identify species on their land and after building a relationship with the landholder, we have finally been able to work together to protect this habitat permanently for future generations to enjoy. This project was funded with support of the Victorian Government. 

For more information about projects in the Glenelg-Hopkins region contact our Conservation Officer  Adam Merrick on (03) 8631 5888 or adamm@tfn.org.au

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Tips

The landholder has also worked with Nature Glenelg Trust to restore wetlands for aquatic  wildlife. Here are some tips for looking after wetlands (and remember to check with your local water authority before doing any works on waterways):

• restore wetland hydrology by blocking/restoring drainage
• remove weeds and monitor for pest fish species
• do not use herbicides or pesticides near waterways or wetlands.

Support our work

Help us protecting habitat for the nationally endangered Southern Brown Bandicoot.


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