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Climate change impacts on East Gippsland

East Gippsland landholders are encouraged to take action now to protect vegetation and manage habitat to ensure it stays as healthy as possible in a changing climate.

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East Gippsland landholders are encouraged to take action now to protect vegetation and manage habitat to ensure it stays as healthy as possible in a changing climate.

Trust for Nature’s Conservation Science Coordinator Dr Doug Robinson said climate change is having major environmental impacts on plant and wetland health in East Gippsland, making it important for landholders to manage the land to give plants and animals the greatest opportunity to survive and successfully raise young.

Trust for Nature is holding a series of workshops across Victoria to help landholders understand what climate change means to them.

Doug said, “The biggest impacts of climate change on East Gippsland are reduced and less reliable rainfall, and higher temperatures.

“This leads to less reliable plant growth, flowering and seed production by plants and consequently has flow-on effects for other wildlife. Climate change is beginning to reduce eucalypt regeneration at a large scale, such as Alpine Ash in the Alps.”

Trust for Nature is working with landholders to help them plan for changes and increase the resilience of plants and animals.

Doug said, “There are landholders in East Gippsland who are planning for changes in climate and introducing management practices to protect habitat.”

Landholders and the general public are invited to a free morning field day at Perry Bridge, Bush Family Reserve, corner Bengworden and Turners Rd, on Sunday October 6, to hear about how to manage conservation in a changing climate and learn about the Trust’s Red Gum thinning trial.

This project is funded with the support of the Victorian Government. Contact Trust for Nature’s Paul Harvey on paulh@tfn.org.au, 0447 764 669 for more information or see this page for more information and to register.