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Discover the Bank Australia Conservation Reserve

Bank Australia made headlines when it became the first bank to purchase land for the purposes of conservation. This initiative is still a world-first and has been created in perpetuity with a Trust for Nature conservation covenant over the 927 hectare property.

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Discover the Bank Australia Conservation Reserve

Bank Australia made headlines when it became the first bank to purchase land for the purposes of conservation.

This initiative is still a world-first and has been created in perpetuity with a Trust for Nature conservation covenant over the 927 hectare property, which ensures the land is protected forever, even after it changes hands.

The Bank Australia Conservation Reserve is one of a handful of private conservation properties opening its gates to the public during the Trust’s annual Spring into Nature program.

Visitors will have an opportunity to tour the property and hear from experts about its threatened Buloke woodlands and the endangered Red-tailed Black Cockatoos that live there.

The Barengi Gadjin Land Council will also run activities focused on its history and involvement with the property.

Trust for Nature Conservation Officer Adam Blake said the reserve is special for a number of reasons.

“The plants and wildlife on it are spectacular. The bank specifically chose this property based on its great environmental values. It’s home to 270 native animal species, 13 of which are threatened,” he said.

“Ten years’ worth of work have gone into protecting the plants and animals on the reserve. Together with Greening Australia, we’ve been reviving habitat for endangered animals, birds, reptiles and frogs who live in tree hollows and log piles on the reserve.”

The open day is on Thursday, 18 October, 10am to 2pm at Coopers Rd, off the Kaniva-Edenhope Rd, Minimay. Lunch is provided.

Register by going to events at www.trustfornature.org.au or http://bit.ly/springintonature